Audiences can’t get enough of ‘It’

Stephen King's novel comes out of shadows better than ever

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Audiences can’t get enough of ‘It’

Kayla Johnson

Kayla Johnson

Kayla Johnson

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Pennywise the Dancing Clown’s infamous line, “We all float down here”, has struck fear into the hearts of many for over thirty years. Now, he makes a spine-chilling reappearance in the new adaptation of “It”, directed by Andy Muschietti.

The movie is based on Stephen King’s 1986 bestselling novel of the same name. “It” follows a series of 1989 kidnappings in Derry, Maine, including the protagonist’s, Bill Denbrough, brother Georgie. Bill, with the help of his friends, who he coins “The Losers’ Club”, attempt to piece together exactly what happened to Georgie and the countless number of children who have gone missing.

The film begins a year before the main storyline. Georgie is playing outside in the rain when his paper boat floats away. He chases it, but the boat falls into a sewer and into the hands of Pennywise. When Georgie attempts to run away, Pennywise bites Georgie’s arm off and kills him.

A year has passed since Georgie’s death when the movie begins into the main storyline. During the summer of 1989, Bill and his band of misfits investigate the spike of kidnappings in Derry. They maneuver through a sequence of twists and turns as Pennywise plays on their worst fears and find that together, they are stronger than Pennywise.

“It” is truly a horror film like no other. Not only does the film incorporate unconventional horror techniques, such as a shape-shifting supernatural presence, but it adds many layers of comic relief. From confusing placebo to gazebo, to a foul-mouthed child who often jokes about mature themes, the movie takes the audience on a rollercoaster of laughs and screams. The film in and of itself is excellent, and brings together Hollywood’s newest and brightest stars.

The film’s shining star, however, is Bill Skarsgård, whose performance as Pennywise rivals Heath Ledger’s Joker. Skarsgård skillfully portrays Pennywise, all whilst adding his own touch to the classic character. Unlike other depictions of horror characters, who often try too hard to scare the audience with jump scares and loads of gore, he frightens the audience simply through his portrayal of human insanity. Whether it is his dialogue or his glowing eyes that seem as if they could kill, Skarsgård gives new meaning to the horror genre.

“It” is not a placebo (or a gazebo), but rather a witty and simply hilarious adaptation of King’s infamous novel, bound to give the audience chills.

 

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