Technology melts snow days away

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Technology melts snow days away

Claire Capra

Claire Capra

Claire Capra

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On July 1, 2019, SB 28 went into effect allowing schools to use e-learning days in lieu of emergency days. This was put into action by the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) to ensure that students are learning the amount that they need. Everyone has been wondering how these e-learning days will work, and why they will be used this year.

The ISBE requires a minimum of 176 days of learning inside of school but allows four teacher institute days and five emergency days. Now, those emergency days are being replaced by e-learning days. This is a great way to keep the curriculum flowing without sudden breaks in the schedule.

“Because of e-learning days, we will have less days built into the actual school year, allowing us to end school earlier,” said Mr. Mike Field, assistant principal.

How do these e-learning days work, a student might ask? Well, it’s very simple. If it is not possible to go to school due to dangerous conditions in the weather, all that a student has to do is to check into each of his or her classes on Blackbaud by 11 a.m. To do this, students must read the teachers’ instructions for the day and submit them. This will allow the student to “attend the class.” Then, the student just has to complete the assignment, which should take no more than 45 minutes each, before the next day. There are definitely some positives and negatives to this new system. Students have different views of this situation. Some students, like sophomore Erik Mikrut, believe these e-learning days will be a challenge due to the teachers not being around to help.

“I don’t like it because the teachers teach things the best when they are in the classroom with you, and can answer questions,” said Mikrut. “This would make learning more challenging.”

Others, like sophomore Rowan McDonnell, view e-learning days with a more positive approach.

“I don’t want to do it, but I understand how it can help us get more learning into the school year,” said McDonnell.

Some students, like sophomore Haley Mills, truly don’t want these days at all.

“I think it is a bad idea because snow days are a good day off for the students and teachers,” said Mills.

Overall, everyone has a different opinion on the new e-learning days, either good or bad, that could eventually change as we get to experience them more often.

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