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Service lifelong journey for alumni

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Service lifelong journey for alumni

"Hillary Paintables and Cotton Candy Bobbi-Polish" from Jacki Stanley's Bobbi Toads allows children to paint their own shoes.

"Hillary Paintables and Cotton Candy Bobbi-Polish" from Jacki Stanley's Bobbi Toads allows children to paint their own shoes.

"Hillary Paintables and Cotton Candy Bobbi-Polish" from Jacki Stanley's Bobbi Toads allows children to paint their own shoes.

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Service is not limited to Viator students; it is a lifelong pursuit. No matter where a person stands—on a mountain top, deep down in a valley, riding the metro, or cramming in a college library —service is always doable. Let’s take a look at how former Lions continue to serve others in college.

Paul Lewis ’14, who now attends Harvard University, founded an organization called VISION (Vision Impairment Screening and Intervention for Optical Needs). The mission of this club is to “contribute towards improving vision globally” while simultaneously “alleviating some of the poverty in the world”. To fulfill their vision, the members are raising funds and recycling used eyeglasses in the U.S. to support a clinic in Ghana. Through the help of the Global Health Collaboration, the organization hosted the Global Health and Leadership Conference for nominated high school students in the greater Boston area.

Laura Dziubyk ’14, cycled 5400 miles across the country to raise funds for Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults. The foundation’s mission is to provide more resources for those with cancer and build a community of support for these young adults. Dziubyk’s brother Matt ’17 was diagnosed with Hodgkin Lymphoma; cycling was Dziubyk’s way of supporting him. In January 2018, Dziubyk raised more money to fight cancer through a fundraiser at Chipotle, which Viator students supported.

Other than serving the marginalized, many alumni also turn to an important group—children. Andrea Doshi ’06, co-founded Queen Girls, a publication team that turns historical female figures’ stories into children’s books. For each book sold, the profits will be donated to children living in poverty. One of the most iconic books, “Bessie, Queen of Sky,” is inspired by the life of Bessie Coleman—the first African American to be a pilot. Jimena Duran, the co-founder and creative director, said the publication seeks to “bring awareness on stereotypes in early childhood literature”. This means that children are exposed to a much broader horizon, beyond the typical princesses, dragons, and princes.

Jacki Stanley ’08 also dedicates his career to children. After graduating from the University of Michigan, Stanley started the shoe company Bobbi-Toads with his dad. Bobbi-Toads include paintable shoes—“little ‘toes’ embossed into the rubber cap [that] can be decorated over and over again with nail polish”—“light-up ‘toes’ and can be customized with nail stickers.” The establishment of this shoe company is closely tied with American Heart Association, which first inspired the Stanleys’ entrepreneurship. Currently, 10% of their profit goes to this organization.

Although not all students remain connected to Viator after graduation, students can always pass down the Viatorian spirit of service. Once a Lion, always a Lion.

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Service lifelong journey for alumni